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Posts tagged as meatless

Turkish Zucchini Pancakes…Again!

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Jul 10, 2013 at 9:49pm

Turkish Zucchini PancakesI first posted this recipe three years ago, but given my recent pancake obsession, I decided it was time for them to return. Since my post, I’ve made them gluten-free with King Arthur gluten-free all-purpose flour and grain-free with chickpea flour. Both fantastic!

Zucchini bread is a family favorite, but if you’re looking for a new twist, savory to boot, add zucchini pancakes to your manage-the-bounty rotation.

Studded with fresh herbs and salty bits of feta cheese, the pancakes pop hot off the griddle tender and eggy, with beautifully crispy edges. I have yet to give them a run with all-purpose gluten-free flour, but I’d guess they’d turn out really nicely. The easiest recipes to adapt successfully utilize a small amount of flour.zucchinipancakes2Make them larger for a satisfying main course, or silver-dollar size for a pretty appetizer. Like my other favorite savory pancakes socca (chickpea flour pancakes), they’re filling and addictive topped with a simple salad of fresh greens or rolled around hot-off-the-grill sausages. However you devour them, serve the pancakes burning hot, tempered with a cool garlic-yogurt sauce. (A fresh tomato sauce would be delicious as well).

Recipe for Turkish Zucchini Pancakes at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

White Bean Salad with Tomato & Avocado aka Power Outage Pantry Salad

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Jun 25, 2013 at 4:40pm

White Bean Salad with Tomato & AvocadoIs your power back on? Hooey what a series of storms. It always breaks my heart to see grand old trees downed, especially if their falling damages homes and cars. I hope that you escaped damage and if not, that you’re back on track soon.

After losing power, I’m thinking ahead to the next outage. Pessimistic? Perhaps, although I’m thinking about the simplest of things – batteries in our clock radios, a plan for where to buy dry ice (suggestions?), and a few more pantry staples. I have an electric cooktop these days, so I was pretty happy to have foods on hand that I could eat at room temperature. But I wished I’d had a few more! Luckily I had canned beans and tuna, as well as a perfectly ripe avocado and tomato, so I was able to pull together this refreshing, filling salad in no time at all.White Bean Salad with Tomato & AvocadoCooked white beans are always lovely to have on hand. I used canned this go-round, but when I’m feeling organized, I’ll cook a pot of them on a Sunday, with garlic, onion, and herbs, and freeze what I don’t eat right away. Bean salads make terrific vegetarian/vegan fare when entertaining and are always popular on buffets because they improve with sitting a bit.

Building a dish atop smashed avocado is my favorite way to include avocado in a salad. Slices are fine, and a dollop of guacamole always rocks, but it’s particularly satisfying to swipe every bite through a perfectly seasoned, smooth and creamy puree. Build on layers of crunch (celery, nuts) and creaminess (olive oil, tender beans, cheeses) for main dish-worthy salads.

Recipe for White Bean Salad with Tomato & Avocado at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Browned Butter: Savory or Sweet

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Jun 12, 2013 at 9:48am

Crepes (gluten-free, grain-free) with Browned Butter BerriesBrowned butter (beurre noisette), is having its moment in the spotlight for good reason. Not that butter isn’t beautiful on its own, but a few minutes of carefully applied heat transforms its subtle sweet saltiness to nutty brown cheesiness, creating a rather magical sauce in the process. If you’ve ever bathed your palate in the beauty of sole meunier, you’ve experienced the flavor punch of browned butter. Ditto financier cakes, nothing more than almond flour, browned butter, and egg whites but powerfully rich and lovely. Basically everything is made better with browned butter (popcorn!), so keep this simple technique tucked in the back of your hungry mind for fast, impressive meals.Spaghetti with Sage Browned ButterAs special as butternut squash ravioli with sage browned butter is, remember that the sauce alone can turn a simple bowl of spaghetti into restaurant-worthy fare.

In 10 minutes.

Yes!Crepes (gluten-free, grain-free) with Browned Butter BerriesFor a fast-sweet treat, toss ripe berries into a panful of browned butter and swirl until bright and syrupy. Spoon over crepes, pancakes, or waffles for a memorable brunch.

Recipe for Basic Browned Butter at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

The pasta in the photo is Tinkyada gluten-free brown rice pasta and it is good. As in, truly al dente delicious. I highly recommend. I picked it up at Linden Hill Co-op, I believe.

The crepes in the photo are gluten-free and grain-free. I’ve been substituting cashew butter for GF all-purpose flour with a fantastic result! Combine 1/2 c. milk, 2 eggs, 1/4 c. cashew butter, and a pinch of salt in a blender. Whir until smooth. Cook as thin pancakes, a few tablespoons of batter at a time, in a small nonstick pan. Eat right away, or cool to room temperature, wrap in plastic, and store in the refrigerator.

Quinoa Cakes topped with…a Poached Egg. But of Course.

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Apr 26, 2013 at 6:46pm

Here’s a thing: my husband and I are divorcing. It’s exactly as sad and stressful as one might imagine, so I’ve been taking extra steps to take really good care of myself. I already know that eating corn and rice makes be feel pretty lousy – not as lousy as eating gluten – but lethargic and puffy nonetheless, so I’ve pretty much eliminated them from my diet. I’ve also made a point of including vegetables in all of my meals, either by juicing, or making smoothies, or eating big salads. Eating light, colorful, crunchy food makes me feel good, fits the season, and makes cooking more fun and interesting.

Although I generally steer away from grains and high carbohydrate food, I do occasionally indulge in quinoa. I just love the nutty taste, and that it makes a terrific breakfast “cereal” as well as a base for a flavor-packed salad. I’ve been eating a lot of hemp seeds lately because they taste a lot like quinoa, but are even higher in protein and fiber with very few carbohydrates. Now when I make quinoa, I make a 50-50 combination of quinoa and hemp seeds (1/2 cup red quinoa, 1/2 cup hemp seeds, 1 cup water, 1/2 tsp. salt; bring to a boil, cover, simmer for 15 minutes or until quinoa is tender and water is absorbed; eat warm or cover and chill to use in salads or the recipe below).

I also absolutely adore beans and legumes. ADORE. I enjoy them in small servings – they’re so lovely in soups or stir-fries or as a binder for savory cakes. The beauty of making crispy cakes (croquettes, really) with quinoa and beans is that you can season them so many different ways. If I’m in the mood for Indian food, I’ll use lentils and garam masala and chiles and top them with raita. If I’m craving Mexican food I’ll season them with cumin and chiles and top them with chicken, salsa, and cilantro. I’m sure you get the idea…

…so I’ll just give you the basic ratios and let you riff on your favorite flavors. You can cook the beans yourself, or open a can of organic refried or whole beans (easily mashed), and in minutes be frying up a crispy cake. Top with a lemon-y salad, or a huge dollop of guacamole (huge!), or a gorgeous pile o’ buttery sauteed mushrooms, or a grass-fed burger (like I did just a few minutes ago). Or:

Quinoa Cakes with Arugula & Poached Eggs (Gluten-free)
Serves 2

You can easily multiply this recipe and keep quinoa-bean mixture in the fridge, ready to fry into cakes for any meal of the day.

1 c. cooked quinoa (or quinoa + hemp seeds, see above)
1/2 c. cooked, mashed beans (pinto, navy, black, lentils, etc.)
sea salt
1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1/2 tsp. chile powder
1 clove garlic, minced
2 Tbsp. tempeh, chopped (optional, adds protein and firmness)
2 Tbsp. crumbled feta cheese (optional)
2 Tbsp. coarsely chopped pepitas or other nuts (optional)
garbanzo bean (chickpea) flour as needed
olive oil
handful arugula leaves, chopped
squeeze of fresh lemon
2 large, organic eggs
freshly ground black pepper
optional: 4 ramps, halved lengthwise

Fill a medium saucepan 2 inches deep with water. Add enough salt to the water for it to be pleasantly salty. Set over medium-high heat.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, stir together the quinoa, beans, 1/2 tsp. salt, cumin, chile powder, garlic, tempeh (if using), feta (if using), and nuts (if using). Add garbanzo bean flour, a few teaspoons at a time, until mixture is firm. Form into two patties and set aside.

Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. When oil is hot, add the quinoa cakes. Fry until nicely browned and crispy (take a peek before flipping) and then carefully flip. Fry until crispy on the second side and transfer to plates. (If using ramps, add another tablespoon of oil to the pan and fry the ramps over medium heat until crispy on both sides. Divide between the two plates.)

When the water boils, turn heat down so that the water is barely simmering—small bubbles should barely break the surface. Crack one egg into a small dish or mug and slide it into the water. Quickly do the same with the second egg. Set the timer for 3 and 1/2 minutes. The eggs whites will look shredded, but that’s OK. Make sure the water maintains no more or no less than barely breaking bubbles.

While the eggs cook, toss the arugula with a squeeze of lemon juice, a drizzle of olive oil, and a pinch of salt. Arrange the arugula atop the quinoa cakes.

When the timer goes off, use a slotted spoon to scoop one egg out of the water. Tilt the spoon so the liquid drains completely off, then place the egg on top of the arugula. Repeat with the second egg. Top eggs with a sprinkle of salt and a few grinds of black pepper each. Serve immediately.

Chile-Tomato "Harissa"

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Mar 6, 2013 at 3:01pm

Is there anything more fun than conjuring something delicious from nothing but your imagination and leftovers? Don’t answer that, but instead consider the primal satisfaction that comes from being both resourceful and frugal. I may have read a few too many Laura Ingalls Wilder stories as a young girl, but preparing meals from a perfect recipe with perfect ingredients is neither as fun nor as tasty as making things up as I go from whatever I have on hand. Urban pioneering. Or something.

Anyhow, that’s all a long explanation for how I arrived at making this harissa, the of-the-moment condiment that is making its way into every meal at our house. Not only was the harissa itself arrived at in my attempt to not waste lovely ingredients leftover from other recipes, but in turn I’m using the harissa to make up an endless number of flavorful dishes on the fly.

I’m calling this harissa although it’s really a deliciously ubiquitous chile-tomato paste, relevant to put a Middle Eastern spin on a dish, but also at home in Tex-Mex and Asian dishes as well. The depth of flavor comes from toasting the chiles and spices as well as roasting the tomatoes. I lean on the grocery-store versions of harissa and chile pastes as much as the next person, but you really can’t beat the intensity and freshness of flavor achieved by making harissa yourself. Harissa typically doesn’t include tomatoes, but I do love how the tomatoes temper the paste’s heat, and add a level of acidity, that I think widens harissa’s horizons. Scrape the finished, cooled paste into a jar and enjoy for several weeks, in any way you can think of.

A few ideas to get you started:

Spoon over leftover steak, pork, chicken, tofu, or any number of vegetables and roll into warm corn tortillas.
Smear on grilled flatbread and top with an egg fried in olive oil.
Stir into broth for cooking couscous or rice. Serve the cooked grains with a dollop of yogurt or sour cream, olives, fresh herbs, a crumble of cheese, and toasted nuts. Top with a poached egg to gild the lily.
Swirl into a bowl of pretty much any soup to take it from just fine to truly incredible. Think Asian noodle soups, Italian-style broth soups, Mexican-style tortilla soups.
Whisk into vinaigrettes.
Add to pasta sauces, creamy or tomato, for lovely color and depth of flavor.
Mix into and onto meatloaf or meatballs.
Brush onto grilling or roasting chicken.
Spread on generously buttered bread before making your best grilled cheese sandwich ever. Ditto quesadillas.

Do not be surprised if you consider rubbing it into sore muscles!

Recipe for Chile-Tomato “Harissa” at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Fresh Mozzarella & Basil Frittata

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Jun 19, 2012 at 9:58am

fresh mozzarella frittata stephanie meyer fresh tart

Fresh mozzarella with tomatoes is everywhere, even in the dead of a Minnesota winter, when it shouldn’t be. We’ve all seen slabs of rubbery cheese layered with slabs of grainy-pale tomato objects and wondered what on earth happened to this pretty salad.

Certainly in the summer, when tomatoes are ripe, the two can be lovely together, but I’m a bit of a fresh mozzarella purist. Addict even. Really good, fresh mozzarella has such a soft, milky taste, a little bit sweet, a little bit salty, at once both silky and toothsome (not rubbery!), that it hurts me a little to smother it with the acidic juiciness of tomatoes, even good ones.

Caprese blasphemy? Perhaps, but try it this way, simply warmed atop eggs and fresh basil, and you might agree.

Recipe for Fresh Mozzarella & Basil Frittata at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Green Goddess Potato Salad

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Jun 5, 2012 at 11:21am

Stephanie Meyer Fresh Tart Green Goddess Potato Salad

Here’s a potato salad to make all season long, with whatever fresh herbs you have on hand. The creamy, tangy dressing requires nothing more than a quick whir in the blender and ta da! – a bowlful of bright green deliciousness that had me eating it straight from the bowl, goddess-style.

Here’s also a potato salad to customize to your heart/stomach/cooler’s content. I added chopped capers because I was craving their salty punch, but a jar of pickled asparagus beckoned as well. My mom always put chopped hard-boiled eggs in her potato salad, which I didn’t love as a kid, but absolutely adore now.

As the season progresses feel free to add:
asparagus
shelled peas or fava beans
cherry tomatoes
fresh corn
sweet onions
torn spinach, arugula, or other greens
green beans
snap or sugar peas

The dressing, as you will (hopefully) soon discover, is as lovely spooned over salad greens, or as a dip for hot or cold vegetables, as it is tossed with potatoes.

Recipe for Green Goddess Potato Salad at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Cauliflower Gratin

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on May 20, 2012 at 5:25pm

cauliflower gratin mfk fisher

Perhaps it’s cliche that I read MFK Fisher’s The Gastronomical Me and wanted to immerse myself in the world of food, but that’s OK. Who wouldn’t want to do exactly that after reading that sexy, scrumptious book? My goodness that woman could write, my mouth waters (and my heart swoons) just thinking about it.

There’s one passage in particular that has had me making simple cauliflower gratins for years. I purposely don’t look back at the specifics, I just count on how incredible she made cauliflower roasted with cream and Gruyere sound, swiped through with crusty bread and enjoyed with cold wine.

Lord.

So here’s my version, so simple, so completely gluten-free, so much better than the pasta dish I served to Nathan and John tonight (in my opinion). I threw in some arugula leaves this evening because I had them, but you wouldn’t need to include them.

Cauliflower Gratin
Serves 4 as a side or 2 as a main course

1 Tbsp. soft butter
1 head cauliflower, cored, separated into 1-inch florets
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 c. heavy cream
fresh whole nutmeg
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
1 c. freshly grated Gruyere, Parmesan, or other favorite cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Smear soft butter into a tart pan. Sprinkle minced garlic across the bottom of the pan.

Bring a large pot of nicely salted water to boil. Add the cauliflower and boil for 3-5 minutes, until cauliflower is tender-crisp. Drain thoroughly in a colander, then transfer cauliflower to tart pan, distributing evenly.

Pour cream over cauliflower. Grate a bit of fresh nutmeg over the cauliflower, then sprinkle lightly with a little salt and several grinds of black pepper. Top with cheese.

Bake gratin for 40-45 minutes, until light golden brown. Remove from oven and let sit for 10 minutes. Serve warm.

Fried Cheese with Almond Meal Crust (Gluten-Free)

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on May 19, 2012 at 7:03pm

fried cheese almond meal gluten-free grain-free

So I had fried cheese for both breakfast and dinner today.

I am ridiculously obsessed with the stuff right now, to such a degree that I kind of embarrassed myself a couple of weeks ago raving about the gluten-free fried cheese curds at Red Stag in NE Minneapolis to Ryan Petz of Fulton Beer. When we ended our conversation with plans for a group brunch, he wryly suggested that maybe we’d best head to Red Stag to assuage my fried cheese craving.

So that’s exactly what we did! And the crispy, salty little treats were so good that I ordered a few more rounds while at Red Stag again this past week with a group of the girls.

Apparently my years at the University of Wisconsin taught me well that There is Never Enough Fried Cheese. And that Beer is Food, although that’s a different post.

But since I can’t very well go running off to Red Stag every time I have a craving for fried cheese, and because tasty cheese curds aren’t completely easy to obtain, I created the version pictured with slices of fresh mozzarella coated with egg and almond flour. The trick for cheese contained within – not exploding out of – a golden crust is to freeze it for a bit before frying.

Serve the melty, golden loveliness with marinara sauce and lots of basil for an almost-summer treat.

Fried Cheese with Almond Meal Crust (Gluten-Free)
Makes 4-6 slices

1 ball of fresh mozzarella, sliced into 4-6 slices, a bit less than 1/2-inch thick
2 c. almond meal
1 tsp. salt
1 large egg, lightly beaten in a flat bowl
olive oil for frying
warm marinara sauce & fresh basil for serving

Line a large plate with parchment paper.

Combine almond meal and salt on a large plate. Dip one slice of cheese in the beaten egg, then dredge the cheese slice in the almond meal mixture. Lay the cheese slice on the parchment paper. Do the same with the remaining cheese slices.

Put the uncovered plate of cheese in the freezer for 30 minutes.

Add 1/4-inch deep olive oil to a medium skillet and heat over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, fry the cold cheese slices a couple at a time, until golden brown on both sides. Transfer slices to a paper towel-lined plate and fry the rest of the cheese. Serve cheese hot with warm marinara sauce & fresh basil.

Potato Galette

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on May 15, 2012 at 3:18pm

potato galette

A potato galette is simply thin slices of potatoes, fat, and seasoning layered into a shallow pan and roasted until crusty and browned. It’s traditional to serve alongside a roast of some sort, and definitely do that, because you can imagine crusty, buttery potatoes do a fine job of soaking up meaty juices of almost any type.

But a potato galette also makes a killer meal all on its own, particularly alongside (or underneath!) a tart arugula salad. In fact, invite people over if you make one, otherwise…you will eat the whole thing by yourself. As healthful as a tart arugula salad is, it will not offset the regret of eating an entire galette on your own; I know this from experience.

I make galettes two ways and I’ll leave it to you to decide which you prefer: Just potatoes and butter, or potatoes and butter with cream. Both yield a crispy top and bottom, but the cream version is creamier vs. crispy. The boys in my house prefer the all-butter version, I prefer the cream. It was not a bad weekend enjoying both!

Buttery potatoes make me badly want a glass of wine, so I checked in with my friend Jason Kallsen, social media marketing for The Wine Company and author of The Grilling Man blog, for the perfect wine pairing. He suggests a richer wine but with acid, perhaps a fine-tuned California Chardonnay such as LIOCO Russian River Valley or Chateau Montelena.

I suggest you take his advice and enjoy together al fresco. This is Minnesota’s most perfect outside dining weather, right now. Enjoy!

Recipe for Potato Galette at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.