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Posts tagged as burgers

Morel Burgers with Ramps

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on May 30, 2013 at 11:51am

morelburgervertHappy National Burger Day! In celebration, I present a grassfed beef/pork combo, laced with ramps and topped with buttery morels and a quick red wine pan sauce. I would have topped it with a fried egg, but given there’s an egg in the mix, I thought that was a bit over-the-top. That said, you could totally top this with a fried egg and be very, very happy. A burger this decadent is best without a bun (given that I can’t eat gluten, I always eat burgers without buns anyhow), especially topped with those glorious morels.morelburgerhorizA word about the egg in the mix…I prefer grassfed beef burgers not just for the better treatment of the animals and the quality of the meat, but also for the bigger, beefier taste. It takes a bit of finesse to make a juicy grassfed (or bison) burger, however, even if you choose a higher fat grind. One trick, via my friend chef Scott Pampuch, is to add an egg to the raw burger, along with salt and pepper, before forming the patties. His theory is that grassfed beef fat melts out more quickly than conventional beef fat, and the egg helps hold the fat in. There’s no question that the egg results in a juicier burger, so definitely give it a try!

This burger is equal to a steak in my mind, so I asked my friend sommelier Leslee Miller of Amusee Wine for a pairing suggestion. Her awesome answer: “I’d choose St. Innocent ‘Shea Vineyard’ Pinot Noir, Yamhill-Carlson AVA, Willamette Valley, Oregon because it’s rich, yet gorgeously balanced with a bright raspberry/cherry center – an Oregon gem! Combining perfectly with the earthy notes of the mushrooms, this Pinot gives a true expression of Willamette Valley’s terroir. Textured with soft baking spices, yet full with complex flavors of marionberry fruit, rose petal, dried herbs and plum – St. Innocent’s ‘Shea Vineyard’ Pinot Noir’s velvety tannins are weighty enough to pair to the combined meats of the burger, yet snuggle in next to the ramps and morels perfectly. Fabulous through to the last bite. Price: $45.”morelburgerhoriz2If you are motivated enough to conjure frites to serve alongside, they would be incredible swiped through that pan sauce. But honestly, this burger can stand alone, which allows the morels to really shine. Despite the fact that it’s National Burger Day, it is more importantly morel season – holy – so indulge while you can. Mmmmmmorels please!

Recipe for Morel Burgers with Ramps at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Pork Burgers

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Oct 9, 2012 at 10:58am

pork burger little foot farm stephanie meyer fresh tart

Burger maniacs (including myself), I have a proposition for you (us)…pork burgers! Why do we all not eat pork burgers? I’m not suggesting that beef burgers are anything but delectable, but I have been pondering – given the borderline gastronomic insanity over bacon, pork belly, and charcuterie – why the heck isn’t a fabulously juicy, porky burger on every menu in this town?

I took my question to Karen Weiss of Little Foot Farm, host of this summer’s Outstanding in the Field farm dinner. Weiss and her partner Sally Doherty raise heritage breed hogs on their picture-perfect farm for chefs like Lenny Russo of Heartland Restaurant and Mike Phillips of Three Sons Meat Co., but they also sell their highly-prized pork to the public, including ground Gloucester Old Spot (GOS) pork.

Weiss confessed that she’s on a mission to convince Minnesotans that pork burgers deserve a spot on everyone’s grill, particularly best-quality pork like she and Doherty raise, the kind that actually tastes like pork.

Pork!

After grilling a few batches myself, I can not agree more. Not that I thought I wouldn’t agree – it’s no secret that I’m a big, BIG pork fan – but holy cow my friends, the first batch of burgers I pulled off the grill were not savored, they were inhaled. I seasoned them with nothing more than salt and pepper so we could enjoy the clean, rich, pure pork flavor that Little Foot’s tender loving care delivers. In a buttered, toasted bun, of course. Gah.

For round two pork play, I added cheddar cheese and tomato jam. Kablam. Future rounds might go breakfast-y with a fried egg and a crumble of bacon to gild the lily. Or Asian-style with scallions, ginger, and a splash of soy sauce. Or bratwurst-esque with caraway cheese and sauerkraut on a pretzel roll. Or even quicky barbecue, with a slathering of sauce topped with slaw before devouring. You get the picture – keep it simple, or go with classic-for-a-reason pork accompaniments. All paths lead to porktastic.

Go!

Tips for perfect, juicy burgers at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

To purchase Little Foot Farm pork, call 612.207.9771 or email customerservice@littlefootfarm.com.