Cook. Nourish. Heal. Celebrate.

Posts tagged as fish

Cauliflower-Leek Soup with Crispy Shrimp (AIP, Paleo)

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Jul 1, 2014 at 1:57pm

Cauliflower-Leek Soup with Crispy Shrimp(AIP, Paleo)For those of you who plan ahead, this is a soup for after the celebrating, when the July 4th ribs and potato salad and pie have been gleefully devoured and left you ready for something lighter. Encourage the pendulum swing back to fresh with restorative rich broth and garden-fresh vegetables, whirred in a blender to something creamy and bright. Make it a meal with crispy shrimp (to me, there is nothing better than crispy shrimp in creamy soup). Or, depending on your mood, garnish with crackling shallots, beefy meatballs, crumbled bacon, sauteed mushrooms, or dried fruit.Cauliflower-Leek Soup with Crispy Shrimp | Fresh Tart (AIP, Paleo)If you’re finding yourself with unmanageable amounts of kohlrabi and various greens in your CSA box, this soup is for you. Roasted kohlrabi is wonderful and purees beautifully. I used mizuna (a bitterish, leafy green) in the soup pictured but I make this soup all the time with spinach, arugula, or cress, whichever I have on hand. Once you nail down the basics, you’ll see that this same technique can be applied to any combination of farmers market and/or garden goodies. Garlic scapes for garlic. Spring onions for leeks. Whatever fresh herbs you desire. On and on.Cauliflower-Leek Soup with Crispy Shrimp | Fresh Tart (AIP, Paleo)Have a safe and festive holiday weekend! You’re making a weekend of it, right? I certainly am. A potluck barbecue on Friday, perhaps a bike ride or a trip to the lake on Saturday. I got a new car last week and I opted for a small SUV (I named her Sally) so I can haul my bike around and you know, not get stuck in the winter. Yes, I’m thinking about winter. Not too much, only in the way one must think about death (heh) – as something inevitable, best used to motivate filling one’s days with sunshine, love, purposeful work, art, music, family, friends, and good food, including canning jam and pickles for the dark days of February.

Happy 4th!

Recipe for Cauliflower-Leek Soup with Crispy Shrimp at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Scallops with Morels, Ramps & Saffron-Coconut Milk Pan Sauce (AIP, Paleo) plus The Slim Palate Paleo Cookbook Giveaway!

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on May 20, 2014 at 1:06pm

Scallops with Morels, Ramps & Saffron-Coconut Milk Sauce (AIP, Paleo) | Fresh TartHelloooooo again and Happy Spring! I’ve been away for so long, finishing a cookbook I’ve been working on called Twin Cities Chef’s Table, highlighting Twin Cities chefs, eateries, and our overall food scene, to be published in Fall 2014. It’s been an incredible project to photograph and write, but I’m excited to be back to sharing recipes with you all.

I couldn’t return in May without writing about ramps and morels, two of my favorite foods on the planet, perhaps this year more than any other given the CRAP winter we just had. I mean, wow, that was tough, in the end mentally more than physically, but I can say that because I didn’t have to shovel snow. For you snow shovelers, you are superheroes, and you have definitely earned a feast of morels. A photo of your plate would be a mountain of morels burying those seared scallops…

AIP Barbecue Chicken Wings with Sauteed Broccoli, Green Goddess DressingPhoto I shared on Instagram of AIP barbecue chicken wings with sauteed broccoli, green goddess dressing

I’m in my third month of the autoimmune protocol allergy elimination diet – see Adventures in Autoimmune Protocol posts for the specifics – and I can report continued improved health and abatement of hypothyroid symptoms and food reactions. In fact…I feel pretty damn amazing. I seem to have crossed some sort of threshold, into a phase of renewal, which I attribute to a rather kablam confluence of events – intense nutrition/healing, spring, wrapping the book, therapeutic reading/reflection/journaling, the support of amazing friends, plenty of rest (and a magical vacation, next post), as much time outdoors as I can swing, and having my life pointed in the right direction. The best way I can describe it is that I have returned myself to myself. Tralalaaah! It’s a wonderful, long overdue, hard-earned feeling.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – I thought the restrictions would be unbearable (no dairy, grains, nuts/seeds, eggs, nightshades, industrial oils, legumes/coffee/chocolate with the goal of reintroducing/testing those foods over the summer to see which specifically were causing my hypothyroid symptoms to roar back), but it hasn’t been unbearable at all and in fact it’s been, um, FUN. It rocks to feel so good, I’ve had a blast cooking, and I am immersed in reading about nutrition, which is exactly how I love to spend my time (recent reads which I highly recommend: The Wahl’s Protocol by Terry Wahl’s, MD; of course The Paleo Approach by Sarah Ballantyne, PhD, which is the protocol I’m following, I refer back to it constantly; Your Personal Paleo Code by Chris Kesser; Deep Nutrition by Catherine Shanahan, MD; The Perfect Health Diet by Paul Jaminet, PhD; It Starts with Food by Melissa and Dallas Hartwig). More on all of those later.
Stephanie Meyer | Fresh TartI don’t usually post pics of myself, but I like what this one says: my hair health is returning and my face is no longer puffy (hair loss/damage and water retention are both hypothyroid symptoms I am glad to have back under control).

One unexpected bonus has been the fantastic interactions I’ve had online around the autoimmune protocol, on Instagram and Facebook in particular. What a marvelous group of people, facing down serious food-related health problems and finding their way back to real, whole food…which means a heck of a lot of cooking. While it’s so easy to feel overwhelmed, it helps me to think about it all as a gift to myself and my loved ones, especially when I’m tired and feeling sorry for myself – my AIP mantra is it is a privilege to cook and eat beautiful food. I understand how woowoo that sounds <insert audible eyeroll>. It’s taken me a long time to feel that way about food and cooking. This blog’s first name was Moderate Epicurean – a reflection of my then thoughts around eating whatever I wanted, in moderation.

But my thoughts have evolved and that’s no longer my goal. It turns out that for me at least, healing occurs and moderation takes care of itself when I skip grains, sugar, alcohol, and vegetable oils (and perhaps eggs and/or dairy and/or nuts, I’ll know more when I reintroduce them), and eat a bounty of whole, unprocessed, nutrient-dense food – high-quality meat, loads of vegetables and (smaller amounts of) fruit, and generous amounts of good fat. Putting an autoimmune (or other chronic health) condition in remission is the best outcome of all, of course, but being free from cravings, guilt, weight gain, mood swings, and low energy is a close second – in fact, without those side-effects, actively striving for moderation is unnecessary. Perhaps that’s a source of my unburdened tralalaaah feeling as well, I hadn’t thought of it until right now. I am free from worrying about my weight, eating every few hours, or whether I’ve had one too many cocktails. It would have been nice to figure that out before I was in my 40s (I began my gluten-free, and then grain-free/Paleo journey almost 4 years ago), but hey. There’s hope for the next generation…The Slim Palate Paleo Cookbook by Joshua Weissman…as exemplified by 18-year old Joshua Weissman, who through giving up processed/packaged non-food and learning to cook real, fresh, nutrient-dense food, lost 100 pounds and reclaimed his health and vibrancy. On his journey, Josh has become a crazy-talented food photographer and recipe writer at his beautiful blog, Slim Palate. In addition – this is one very accomplished young man! – he recently published the smash hit The Slim Palate Paleo Cookbook, a book rich with delectable, approachable recipes for everyday and special-occasion cooking. Josh has accomplished all of this while finishing his senior year in high school. In honor of all of his accomplishments – and in honor of spring, and fresh food, and good health – I can’t imagine a better way to return to blogging than to give away a copy of his book! Leave a note in comments if you’re interested, I’ll announce a winner here on Fresh Tart in one week, next Tuesday, May 27.Scallops with Morels, Ramps & Saffron-Coconut Milk Sauce (AIP, Paleo) | Fresh TartThe recipe is adapted from Josh’s book. I gave an option for using fresh morels and ramps – ’tis the season, of course – but the dish is gorgeous with dried morels too, which makes it an all-season recipe. As a one-pan dish, it’s a weeknight recipe as well. And as scallops with morels and ramps, it’s a party recipe too!

Recipe for Scallops with Morels, Ramps & Saffron-Coconut Milk Pan Sauce (AIP, Paleo) is at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Green Gazpacho with Fried Shrimp: Tomato Party Part I

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Aug 14, 2013 at 9:39am

Green Gazpacho with Fried Shrimp
As pretty as green gazpacho is – a tangy twist on the usual – what I enjoy most about this dish is the fried shrimp WITH the gazpacho. With any gazpacho! I ordered the two together in a Palm Beach restaurant years ago – a smooth, creamy gazpacho with a side of hot, crispy little rock shrimps, so fresh and sweet – and the two were thereafter married in my mind.

I think people assume that both gazpacho and fried shrimp are time-consuming to make but honestly, they’re both fast and easy. Toss ingredients in a blender, chop, taste, adjust seasonings, chop some more, perhaps go full-on puree…done. You have gazpacho.

Green Gazpacho with Fried ShrimpAnd fried shrimp, at least the way I like them, with just a whisper of a crunchy coating, take no more time than sauteeing them.

I didn’t include it in this go-round, but the Grilled Corn Salsa I shared a couple of years back is a perfect gazpacho garnish!

Recipe for Green Gazpacho with Fried Shrimp at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Tostones (Fried Plantains) with Pineapple Salsa

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Jul 16, 2013 at 3:00pm

Tostones with Pineapple SalsaI had such a hard time deciding what to focus on for this post. The pineapple salsa, so gorgeous with fish, also gorgeous made with ripe-right-now peaches? Or the tostones (twice-fried plantains), which are so easy to make, although if you’d rather have fresh corn tortillas, those would be heavenly too? Or the black bean spread, which was supposed to be guacamole, but my avocados were hard as rocks, therefore black bean spread? I was (am) all over the board, tempted to suggest in effect several of my favorite foods, all in one post.

So let me present them all as options and let you decide which combination of sweet, salty, spicy, crispy, chewy, and creamy hits the spot. Mix and match:

Tostones or fresh corn tortillas
Black beans or guacamole
Crab, halibut, or shrimp
Pineapple, pineapple + peach, or peach salsaTostones with Pineappple SalsaPictured are tostones topped with black beans, pineapple salsa, and crab meat. It’s a pretty killer combination. I devoured them for dinner, but at two bites apiece (by my wolfy measure), they’d make a terrific party appetizer. Given canned lump crab meat, seasoned with ground cumin, fresh lime juice, and a bit of minced serrano chile, they’re ready in less than 30 minutes. If you rolled the goods in scorched fresh tortillas…15 minutes, easily. Heck, you could even pile it all atop store-bought tortilla chips, a flavor-crunch-explosion of an easy hors d’oeuvre if ever there was one.

That said, if you’re grilling anyhow, why not toss a couple of skewers of shrimp on ahead of time? Brush with garlicky oil, sprinkle with salt, and when they’re done, finish with squeezes of fresh lime juice. The guacamole angle would be pretty dreamy here. As would peach salsa.pinapplesalsasalsaWhen I make the halibut, which I most certainly will get around to soon, I’ll pan roast it and top it with pineapple salsa and nothing else. It’s hard to improve upon the perfection of crusty-silky halibut.

You have the idea. Get started with the pineapple salsa and tostone recipes and have some spicy, crispy fun!

Recipes for Pineapple Salsa and Tostones at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Whole Fish Baked in a Salt Crust with Fennel & Olives

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Apr 24, 2013 at 12:30pm

I had the pleasure just a few short weeks ago of doing a cooking demo at the Minneapolis Home & Garden Show with Sea Change executive chef Jamie Malone. Since the show, Malone was named to Food & Wine Magazine’s list of Best New Chefs 2013! Very exciting for her, and for Minneapolis. If you’re waiting for a show at the Guthrie to enjoy a meal at Sea Change, you’re so missing out. Very soon, when spring arrives, make your way over to their stunning patio, overlooking the Stone Arch Bridge, and feast upon oysters and perfectly cooked, sustainable fish, washed down with beautiful wine. A night to remember, for sure.

And for a night at home in front of a roaring fire, because that’s just where we’re still at, make this simple, elegant fish. I hadn’t baked fish in a salt crust before doing the demo with Malone, but I sure will now. First of all, it’s really fun. The crust is just egg whites and kosher salt, mixed until it feels like wet sand.

It takes just a couple of minutes to pat it around the fish – and draw on a smiley face, per Malone’s suggestion – which can be done ahead by a few hours if you like. After a brief bake, crack open the crust (very impressive) to reveal moist, silky fish, not salty at all but perfectly seasoned, ready to eat alongside spring vegetables with a drizzle of best olive oil. You can’t beat if for elegance and simplicity.

I made the version in the picture with whole snapper because I hadn’t called ahead for striped bass. After having both (the striped bass at the Home & Garden Show with Malone vs. the snapper I made) call Coastal Seafoods ahead for the striped bass (they can order it but don’t stock it); it’s meatier flesh is a perfect fit for baking inside the crust.

Chef Jamie Malone’s recipe for Whole Fish Baked in a Salt Crust with Fennel & Olives at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Andrew Zimmern’s Baltimore-Style Crab Cakes

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Aug 28, 2012 at 11:40am

andrew zimmern baltimore style crab cake stephanie meyer fresh tart

Along with my father-in-law’s famously fabulous crab cakes, my other favorite is Andrew Zimmern’s version, via our mutual friend Carol Mack. Both recipes have in common a very, very small amount of breading. Crab cakes should be mostly crab! Really, really good lump crab, in fact.

Recipe for Baltimore-Style Crab Cakes at Andrew Zimmern’s Kitchen Adventures/Food & Wine Magazine.

Crab & Sweet Corn Chowder

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Aug 22, 2012 at 2:24pm

crab corn chowder stephanie meyer fresh tart

Hello from my (ridiculously brief) summer vacation in East Hampton. The only reason I’m posting a recipe while on vacation is that the local produce out here is so astonishing that I’m inspired to cook here more than I am at home. As much as the area is known for spiffy homes, those homes are separated by farms and farm stands bursting with glorious peaches, grapes, melons, vegetables, tomatoes, and berries. The sweet corn in particular haunts my beachy dreams with its caviar-pop sweetness.

east hampton stephanie meyer fresh tart

east hampton stephanie meyer fresh tart

east hampton stephanie meyer fresh tart

east hampton stephanie meyer fresh tart

As an added bonus, the fish scene is as fresh as the fashion. Every summer, my father-in-law makes us his famous crab cakes, a recipe I’ve already shared, so this year I settled on making up a crab and sweet corn chowder. It’s not difficult to put your hands on good lump crab meat in Minnesota (Coastal Seafoods sells it, for instance), and Lord knows we know good sweet corn right exactly now. Work in some of the fresh herbs overgrowing your garden, serve wearing high heels alongside a plate of perfectly ripe tomatoes, and call it August, Hamptons-in-Minnesota style.

Recipe for Crab & Sweet Corn Chowder at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

country chef challenge minneapolis

And oh, congratulations chef Sameh Wadi (Saffron, World Street Kitchen) for his win at the Minneapolis Farmers Market Country Chef Challenge this past Saturday! He and chef Jack Riebel (Butcher and the Boar) faced off with fresh-and-fabulous items quickly gathered at the market. I was a lucky, lucky judge, along with Lee Dean, food editor at the Star Tribune, and Matt Brickman and Jamie Yuccas, weekend anchors at WCCO-TV.

beer cheese soup jack riebel

Jack Riebel’s luscious beer cheese soup with tomatoes, chiles, maple-glazed bacon, fried croutons.

tomato salad sameh wadi

trout tagine sameh wadi

Sameh Wadi’s stunning tomato salad with smoked tomato vinaigrette and raspberries (top) and fragrant trout tagine with squash and sweet corn.

Not a bad way to kick off the weekend, ha! I went from the market to the airport. Whee! Nice.

tomato jam stephanie meyer fresh tart provisions

Notice how both chefs featured the gorgeous tomatoes flooding the markets right now. If you’re looking for new (as well as tried-and-true) ways to use the tomatoes in your garden or at the market (like the gorgeous tomato jam pictured!), join chef Scott Pampuch and me for the last class in our Provisions series at Kitchen in the Market. This Thursday night we will be talking and eating tomatoes and berries: Jams, syrups, freezing, sauces, preserving in oil, on and on and on. We’ll share tasty cocktails and a delicious meal as we chat and learn. Join us!

Crispy Soft-Shell Crabs with Spicy Bangalore-Style Dipping Sauce

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on May 20, 2012 at 8:23am

crispy soft-shell crab bangalore-style dipping sauce andrew zimmern

Tis the season for the glory of soft-shell crabs, fried crispy and devoured while tongue-burning hot. They’re in restaurants everywhere right now but they’re a breeze to make at home as well, so if the craving strikes…get frying!

The Bangalore-style sauce is laced with chiles and fresh herbs, a perfect foil for rich, crispy crab.

Recipe for Crispy Soft-Shell Crabs with Spicy Bangalore-Style Dipping Sauce at Andrew Zimmern’s Kitchen Adventures/Food & Wine Magazine.

Grilled Butterflied Shrimp

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Apr 24, 2012 at 1:44pm

butterflied shrimp in the shell

These butterflied shrimp are more of a technique than a recipe, a simple way to grill truly shrimpy shrimp.

Shrimp shells are where the flavor is at – even if you’re preparing shelled shrimp for a salad or pasta, keep the shells! Either freeze them in an airtight plastic bag or make quick batches of stock as you go and freeze the stock. Use the stock to make risotto, soup, a simple pan sauce…wherever you add it, it’s an incredible punch of flavor for very little effort.

Or especially during grilling season, just cook the shrimp in their shells. To not have to fuss with skewers, or with peeling hot shrimp (which is a bit of a pain), remove the legs from large shrimp (U15), then with a small, sharp knife, split them lengthwise down the middle without cutting all the way through the shells. Remove the vein that runs down the middle (running them under cold water makes the process go quickly) and press gently on the shrimp to flatten them. I set them on a baking sheet as I go, dry them all with paper towels when I’m done, then drizzle them with olive oil on both sides. I then sprinkle them very lightly with salt and grill over medium high heat until the shells are pink and the flesh is completely opaque, usually about 3 minutes per side.

Serving suggestions at TC Taste/Minnesota Monthly Magazine.

Golden Coin Chicken-n-Shrimp Skewers with Peanut Sauce

Posted by Stephanie Meyer on Feb 19, 2012 at 8:40am

golden coin chicken shrimp skewers andrew zimmern

Tender chicken and shrimp wrapped around sugar cane, grilled, then topped with spicy peanut sauce. Wrap in lettuce leaves and devour, preferably less maniacally than I did, I could not get enough of these.

Recipe for Golden Coin Chicken-n-Shrimp Skewers with Peanut Sauce at Andrew Zimmern’s Kitchen Adventures/Food & Wine Magazine.